Divorce, Treasures, and Research Locales with Pam Eagleson

March 7th, 2017 by National Genealogical Society Blog Editor

Methodology, W160, “Divorce Records in Genealogical Research,”
4 pm, Wednesday, 10 May 2017

Historical Context, F327, “Grandma’s Treasure Chest Revisited,”
11 am, Friday, 12 May 2017

BCG Skillbuilding, S441, “Expanding Your Views: Knowing Your Research Locales,”
2:30 pm, Saturday, 13 May 2017

Speaker BIO: Pam Stone Eagleson, CG® of Kennebunk, Maine is a researcher, writer, and lecturer conducting client research nationwide with an emphasis on New England, the mid-Atlantic, and the Midwest. Winner of the 2004 National Genealogical Society’s Family History Writing contest, Pam is a graduate of Northwestern University witha B.A. degree in history and sociology, the University of Southern Maine with a M.S.Ed. andTufts University with a C.A.S. in Museum Studies. Pam served six years on the Board of the Association of Professional Genealogists and currently serves as Director at Large on the Board of the National Genealogical Society.

Pam will give three lectures in Raleigh.

“Divorce Records in Genealogical Research,” (W160, 4 pm, Wednesday, 10 May 2017).
“This lecture focuses on the time period from the early 1800s to the early 1900s. Often it is not known that a divorce existed. Clues to the existence of a divorce can be found in census records, newspapers, society publications, indexes (printed, filmed or online), printed abstracts, printed genealogies, death certificates, military pension, old letters, and family lore.

“Grandma’s Treasure Chest Revisited,” (F327, 11 am, Friday, 12 May 2017).
This lecture explains a method for identifying, evaluating,and documenting family artifacts; and revealing the stories they may tell. Among the artifacts examined and documented: Great Grandma Eliza’s 1866 coin silver spoons, samplers made by Great Great Grandmother Alice and daughter Sarah in the early 1800s, Florence’s sugar bucket from the 1800s, Grandpa’s double barreled shotgun, Dexter’s World War II jacket and Clara’s baby grand piano.

“Expanding Your Views: Knowing Your Research Locales,” (S441, 2:30 pm, Saturday, 13 May 2017).
As we search for our ancestors and their stories, a basic tenet of genealogical research is to familiarize ourselves with our research locales. Research requiring a reasonably exhaustive search may lead to sources in several new or different locales. This lecture explains a process to follow when faced with new research locales and gives two examples of how problems were solved by digging deeper in new locales.”

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